How Every Writer Has Their Own Method

One of my blog posts on writing was featured on A Writer’s Path as a guest post:

A Writer's Path

How many of you remember the dreaded research papers you had to write in high school?  Raise your hand.  Better off, don’t raise your hand.  That’s too reminiscent of being back in school.  But anyway, I’ll tell you this: if I never have to write another research paper in my life, I won’t complain.

What I hated the most about the process was how formal and rigid it was.  When I was in school, the Internet was still pretty new, so we, the unfortunate victims, spent hours in libraries using dusty reference books that served better as paper weights and taking notes from pages with tiny print.  We had to write on 3×5 notecards in pencil.  We needed to come up with an outline, and this was to be done the proper way with the numbers, letters, Roman numerals, and I don’t even know what.  The rough draft was written…

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What Annie Read // Lorna versus Laura by Cynthia Hilston

A thoughtful, lovely, and honest review of my book, Lorna versus Laura, from a different perspective:

Annie Likes Words

36001746Lorna versus Laura by Cynthia Hilston
Published September 2nd, 2017
Self-Published

I received a copy of Lorna versus Laura in exchange for an honest review.

Find On // Amazon // Goodreads // Cynthia Hilston

Goodreads Synopsis:

Ever since a tragic accident took the lives of her parents, grief-stricken and lonely Lorna Ashford has buried herself by destroying everything left behind — objects, memories, relationships, and even her faith. In the backdrop of 1940s Cleveland, Ohio, Lorna sets out to begin anew after her brother leaves to fight in World War II. Living in a new house, she takes up painting and strikes up an unlikely friendship with the eccentric widower next door. But something is off about neighbor Tristan Blake, who lives in a house stuck in the past — his wife’s blackened out eyes stare out of picture frames, and dead flowers linger in her vases. Lorna can’t figure…

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Meditation

ChinHooi Ng's Poetic Notes

Meditation is not indifference

meditation is not reticence

meditation is a kind of learning

simple yet recondite

serene and wise

calm contrivance

meditation is a virtue

a kind of wisdom

a kind of knowledge

a kind of grace

a kind of force

a kind of art

a kind of wealth

the meditative sun is a kind of glory

the meditative mountain is towering

the meditative blue sky is lofty

the meditative earth is broad

the meditative grassland is vast

the meditative time is profound

the meditative elderly is maturity

the sea after meditation

finally rolls up the waves

the horizon after meditation

finally raises up the sun

after all the meditation

the natural world finally awakens

a new year

a new spring

after years of meditation

history finally lights up

new students.

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Critique Technique, Part 42—The Dreaded Expository Lump

Good to remember. I know I’ve been guilty of this.

cochisewriters

Old car stuck in the mud photo credit: Toronto History via photopincc

Ah, the dreaded expository lump, that moldering mass of minutiae, that exhausting example of authorial excreta, that soggy swamp of supercilious sentences that sends the reader straight into the Slough of Despond. (Yeesh, enough with the purple prose.)

You know what the expository lump is, of course: that paragraph or page—or worse yet, pages—in which the author stops the story to tell you everything he knows about a particular character, setting, situation, etc. His intent is good—there are things the reader needs to know—but not all of them, not right now. And not all at once.

Unfortunately, this lump, also known as an info- or data-dump, isn’t the exclusive province of the novice writer. We all risk writing it. As we get better, perhaps our lumps and dumps are shorter and a little less obvious: a sentence or two, rather than a paragraph…

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